Friday, 12 July 2013

How to trace / check if an OSS SAP Note is deployed / implemented in your system or not ( SNOTE )

SAP frequently releases “Online SAP Support” (OSS) Notes which may contain bug fixes , new program developments or enhancements or other miscellaneous updates.

At times before you begin work , it will be required to check whether a particular note is present in your SAP system
To ensure that a particular OSS note is present in your SAP system ,execute the following steps:


a)In SAP command prompt , Enter TCode # SNOTE
How to trace if an OSS Note is deployed in your landscape sap support sap basis  


b) In the next screen, Click  SAP Note Browser


How to trace if an OSS Note is deployed in your landscape sap support sap basis  


c) Type in your SAP Note Number in the corresponding text field and click execute


How to trace if an OSS Note is deployed in your landscape sap support sap basis  


d) Next Screen shows status of the SAP note


How to trace if an OSS Note is deployed in your landscape sap support sap basis  



For a background, a SAP note could have any of the following seven status -
  • Can be implemented
  • Cannot be implemented
  • Completely implemented
  • Incompletely implemented
  • Obsolete
  • Obsolete version implemented
  • Undefined Implementation State

How to Determine SAP GUI Version / Patch level / Build number

In order to determine SAPGui Version installed on your client PC and to know the Patch Level of your SAP GUI installation, SAP users or ABAP developers can use SAPLOGON or SAPLOGONPAD application.


Open your SAP Logon Pad by a double-clicking to the icon on your desktop.

sap-logon-pad-shortcut


Click on the top-left corner of the SAP Logon Pad window.
Select the "About SAP Logon..." option which is displayed as the last option, as shown in the image below.



about-sap-logon-pad-710-version-info

An info screen which is similar to the one shown below will appear.
Check the lines with label "Release" and "Patch Level".



sap-version-information-sap-gui-for-windows


Here in this example, the SAP GUI version number is 7100.4.17.1046.
 
The first part 7100 of the SAP Gui version gives us the release information.
This SAP GUI is the Final Release 710 (means 7.10).


You can also see that the patch level is displayed as 17 (look at line Patch Level 17).

  1046 which is the last portion of the version number is showing us the internal build number of the GUI 
 
It is also possible to take the version information from the file properties of the SAPGUI.EXE executable file.
SAPGUI application executable can be found in file folder "C:\Program Files\SAP\FrontEnd\SAPgui\SAPgui.exe" with a default SAP GUI installation.

How to check current kernel Version/ Release in SAP


To check the Kernel version, login to SAP system, click on System pull down menu and then select Status 



GUI trouble2 

Then click on kernel information as shown in below image, this will result another popup which will show current kernel release


GUI trouble3

How to check Current SAP Support Package level of each component

1. Log into your SAP system

2. Click on System > Status in the menu




3. Click on the magnifying glass icon in the pop-up window, below component version



4. It will show your current SAP Support Package of each component.

Types of SAP Upgrades

SAP has three main types of upgrade.

Technical Upgrade: Considered to be the fastest upgrade which does not disturb any of the existing business processes.

Functional Upgrade: This upgrade starts with a technical upgrade, mentioned above. A functional upgrade allows new functionality to be implemented as part of the upgrade project. This upgrade type also provides you with the ability to convert many of the custom process into standard functionality.

Strategic Upgrade: This is driven by enterprise SOA to provide more flexibility to business process innovation.


Technical Upgrade vs Functional Upgrade :

As the name implies, technical upgrade only upgrades the software to the latest version and the new functionalities that come with the new version are
not activated or implemented. Whereas in a functional upgrade, the functionalities offered by the new SAP version are also implemented in addition
to technically upgrading the software.

Need Of SAP Upgrade

Why upgrade?

The first and easiest, but maybe not the most correct answer, is to remain in support. 
It's true though, by upgrading, customers will have their strategic business software of choice in support until December 31st 2020 which by any means provides a great deal of stability and peace of mind budget holders - this could be a reason enough, however this is not the norm from my experience.

Secondly, there normally has to be a business case and this is where things get interesting.  Finding the benefits a customer could employ from an upgrade carries far more weight behind a business case.  For example what seems to be a current popular customer choice is technical consolidation where cost reductions are realised or the upgrade was to provide a platform for the take up of a further SAP module where process improvements could then be employed.  

Thirdly, you have those customers that have seen the future and want, no need, the likes of  SRM, CRM, Mobile, Cloud, and HANA right now to stay ahead of the competition.  They can't wait, the impulse is too much.  SAP HANA right now is producing so many lines of enquiry it's scary  - nearly as scary as the lines of data SAP HANA can process in a second.   
An upgrade becomes 'just a prerequisite' in these cases - an important stepping stone to all those new toys and a business case may be straight forward.

 YourSAPUpgradeIsSpecial
You know your own reason for upgrading and no doubt you sit somewhere in an innovative/visionary loop where you have an eye on the future tech but not yet committed or you want the tech now.  Either way it makes no difference, the result is the same - the current SAP components need to be upgraded to supported versions.


Why upgrade?
The first and easiest, but maybe not the most correct answer, is to remain in support.  Yes some customers will need to remain legally compliant; others will want the peace of mind that if there's a problem it can be raised and some TLC can be applied to their solution and for others this reason will only get so far up the chain of budgetary approval before getting kicked back down.
It's true though, by upgrading, customers will have their strategic business software of choice in support until December 31st 2020 which by any means provides a great deal of stability and peace of mind budget holders - this could be a reason enough, however this is not the norm from my experience.
Secondly, there normally has to be a business case and this is where things get interesting.  Finding the benefits a customer could employ from an upgrade carries far more weight behind a business case.  For example what seems to be a current popular customer choice is technical consolidation where cost reductions are realised or the upgrade was to provide a platform for the take up of a further SAP module where process improvements could then be employed. 
Thirdly, you have those customers that have seen the future and want, no need, the likes of Mobile, Cloud, and HANA right now to stay ahead of the competition.  They can't wait, the impulse is too much.  SAP HANA right now is producing so many lines of enquiry it's scary (John Appleby has many blogs on HANA and well worth a check out) - nearly as scary as the lines of data SAP HANA can process in a second.   
An upgrade becomes 'just a prerequisite' in these cases - an important stepping stone to all those new toys and a business case may be straight forward.
YourSAPUpgradeIsSpecial
You know your own reason for upgrading and no doubt you sit somewhere in an innovative/visionary loop where you have an eye on the future tech but not yet committed or you want the tech now.  Either way it makes no difference, the result is the same - the current SAP components need to be upgraded to supported versions.
There is one consistent, upgrade customers for sure want to leverage their investment to date and those more mature SAP customers find upgrades a necessary evil.  In this respect SAP are making things easier post upgrade by making new functionality available through the regular release of enhancement packs thereby removing the core upgrade requirement - happy days indeed!
SAP themselves has produced some interesting video clips covering off a few of these areas.
- See more at: http://www.bluefinsolutions.com/insights/blog/your_sap_upgrade_is_special/#sthash.SJsIIw3U.dpuf
Why upgrade?
The first and easiest, but maybe not the most correct answer, is to remain in support.  Yes some customers will need to remain legally compliant; others will want the peace of mind that if there's a problem it can be raised and some TLC can be applied to their solution and for others this reason will only get so far up the chain of budgetary approval before getting kicked back down.
It's true though, by upgrading, customers will have their strategic business software of choice in support until December 31st 2020 which by any means provides a great deal of stability and peace of mind budget holders - this could be a reason enough, however this is not the norm from my experience.
Secondly, there normally has to be a business case and this is where things get interesting.  Finding the benefits a customer could employ from an upgrade carries far more weight behind a business case.  For example what seems to be a current popular customer choice is technical consolidation where cost reductions are realised or the upgrade was to provide a platform for the take up of a further SAP module where process improvements could then be employed. 
Thirdly, you have those customers that have seen the future and want, no need, the likes of Mobile, Cloud, and HANA right now to stay ahead of the competition.  They can't wait, the impulse is too much.  SAP HANA right now is producing so many lines of enquiry it's scary (John Appleby has many blogs on HANA and well worth a check out) - nearly as scary as the lines of data SAP HANA can process in a second.   
An upgrade becomes 'just a prerequisite' in these cases - an important stepping stone to all those new toys and a business case may be straight forward.
YourSAPUpgradeIsSpecial
You know your own reason for upgrading and no doubt you sit somewhere in an innovative/visionary loop where you have an eye on the future tech but not yet committed or you want the tech now.  Either way it makes no difference, the result is the same - the current SAP components need to be upgraded to supported versions.
There is one consistent, upgrade customers for sure want to leverage their investment to date and those more mature SAP customers find upgrades a necessary evil.  In this respect SAP are making things easier post upgrade by making new functionality available through the regular release of enhancement packs thereby removing the core upgrade requirement - happy days indeed!
SAP themselves has produced some interesting video clips covering off a few of these areas.
- See more at: http://www.bluefinsolutions.com/insights/blog/your_sap_upgrade_is_special/#sthash.SJsIIw3U.dpuf
Why upgrade?
The first and easiest, but maybe not the most correct answer, is to remain in support.  Yes some customers will need to remain legally compliant; others will want the peace of mind that if there's a problem it can be raised and some TLC can be applied to their solution and for others this reason will only get so far up the chain of budgetary approval before getting kicked back down.
It's true though, by upgrading, customers will have their strategic business software of choice in support until December 31st 2020 which by any means provides a great deal of stability and peace of mind budget holders - this could be a reason enough, however this is not the norm from my experience.
Secondly, there normally has to be a business case and this is where things get interesting.  Finding the benefits a customer could employ from an upgrade carries far more weight behind a business case.  For example what seems to be a current popular customer choice is technical consolidation where cost reductions are realised or the upgrade was to provide a platform for the take up of a further SAP module where process improvements could then be employed. 
Thirdly, you have those customers that have seen the future and want, no need, the likes of Mobile, Cloud, and HANA right now to stay ahead of the competition.  They can't wait, the impulse is too much.  SAP HANA right now is producing so many lines of enquiry it's scary (John Appleby has many blogs on HANA and well worth a check out) - nearly as scary as the lines of data SAP HANA can process in a second.   
An upgrade becomes 'just a prerequisite' in these cases - an important stepping stone to all those new toys and a business case may be straight forward.
YourSAPUpgradeIsSpecial
You know your own reason for upgrading and no doubt you sit somewhere in an innovative/visionary loop where you have an eye on the future tech but not yet committed or you want the tech now.  Either way it makes no difference, the result is the same - the current SAP components need to be upgraded to supported versions.
There is one consistent, upgrade customers for sure want to leverage their investment to date and those more mature SAP customers find upgrades a necessary evil.  In this respect SAP are making things easier post upgrade by making new functionality available through the regular release of enhancement packs thereby removing the core upgrade requirement - happy days indeed!
SAP themselves has produced some interesting video clips covering off a few of these areas.
- See more at: http://www.bluefinsolutions.com/insights/blog/your_sap_upgrade_is_special/#sthash.SJsIIw3U.dpuf
Why upgrade?
The first and easiest, but maybe not the most correct answer, is to remain in support.  Yes some customers will need to remain legally compliant; others will want the peace of mind that if there's a problem it can be raised and some TLC can be applied to their solution and for others this reason will only get so far up the chain of budgetary approval before getting kicked back down.
It's true though, by upgrading, customers will have their strategic business software of choice in support until December 31st 2020 which by any means provides a great deal of stability and peace of mind budget holders - this could be a reason enough, however this is not the norm from my experience.
Secondly, there normally has to be a business case and this is where things get interesting.  Finding the benefits a customer could employ from an upgrade carries far more weight behind a business case.  For example what seems to be a current popular customer choice is technical consolidation where cost reductions are realised or the upgrade was to provide a platform for the take up of a further SAP module where process improvements could then be employed. 
Thirdly, you have those customers that have seen the future and want, no need, the likes of Mobile, Cloud, and HANA right now to stay ahead of the competition.  They can't wait, the impulse is too much.  SAP HANA right now is producing so many lines of enquiry it's scary (John Appleby has many blogs on HANA and well worth a check out) - nearly as scary as the lines of data SAP HANA can process in a second.   
An upgrade becomes 'just a prerequisite' in these cases - an important stepping stone to all those new toys and a business case may be straight forward.
YourSAPUpgradeIsSpecial
You know your own reason for upgrading and no doubt you sit somewhere in an innovative/visionary loop where you have an eye on the future tech but not yet committed or you want the tech now.  Either way it makes no difference, the result is the same - the current SAP components need to be upgraded to supported versions.
There is one consistent, upgrade customers for sure want to leverage their investment to date and those more mature SAP customers find upgrades a necessary evil.  In this respect SAP are making things easier post upgrade by making new functionality available through the regular release of enhancement packs thereby removing the core upgrade requirement - happy days indeed!
SAP themselves has produced some interesting video clips covering off a few of these areas.
- See more at: http://www.bluefinsolutions.com/insights/blog/your_sap_upgrade_is_special/#sthash.SJsIIw3U.dpuf

What is SAP Up-gradation

Upgrading is the process of replacing a product with a newer version of the same product.

Typically, software companies sell upgrades to prevent users from switching to other products. and providing additional fuctinalities in their product.

In case of SAP, ECC 4.7, ECC 6.0 are the versions of upgrade.

Wednesday, 10 July 2013

How to setup a Default Printer in SAP ( SU3 )

1. AFTER LOGGING ON TO THE SAP GUI you will be at the SAP Easy Access Menu. Type in Transaction Code SU3 and hit Enter

 

2. The following screen will appear and you should click on the Defaults tab.


 


3. Click on the right side of the OutputDevice box so the Pick List icon appears.

 


4. When the following box appears, click on the .



5. This will bring up a list of all of your available printers. The standard printer options

highlight the printer you want as your default printer, then click on  


 


6. Your Maintain User Profile screen should look like this. Make sure to check the Output Immediately option box. Then click on the Save icon.

 

 Default Printer setup complete.